Canning/ Condiment/ Recipe

Seedless Blackberry Jam

September 10, 2018 (Last Updated: July 11, 2019)

Fresh Blackberries and Sugar are the only two ingredients needed to make this delicious jam!

Homemade jam in canning jars with fresh blackberries

We have been picking wild blackberries like crazy. Rod told me we have over 8 gallons in the freezer! I’ve also been making Blackberry Muffins and Seedless Blackberry Jam. Another favorite is Blackberry Pie Bars

Several years ago I made blackberry jam, but left the seeds in. The jam was delicious, but the seeds seemed really large. I actually thought the jam was hard to eat. Making this jam seedless took an extra step, but was well worth it! 

Picking wild blackberries to use in homemade seedless blackberry jam.

Tips for making seedless blackberry jam:

The first step to making this jam is picking the berries! Okay, that’s pretty obvious. You could also buy the berries if that worked better for you, but you need blackberries! I threw the fresh blackberries into a Chinois Strainer or a food press and mushed up the berries.

All the seeds stayed inside the strainer and the juices and most of the pulp fell through the holes and into the bowl. 

Freshly picked wild blackberries for seedless blackberry jam

What is pectin?

Pectin is a naturally found substance in many berries and fruits. It is also produced commercially to aide in setting jams and jellies. Commercial pectin requires an exact amount of fruit and a high amount of sugar in order for the jam or jelly to set. 

Are blackberries high in pectin?

Blackberries are naturally high in pectin so no added pectin is needed. I always add a few reddish blackberries into the mix because they have even more pectin than the riper black ones.

Because this recipe doesn’t use a commercially added pectin, the amount of sugar added is all up to you! I added 4 cups of sugar to 8 cups of strained fruit. Most jam recipes call for equal amounts of sugar to fruit!

I think blackberries are naturally sweet and don’t need all that extra sugar.

Seedless blackberry jam is perfect for breakfast on a toasted English muffin

This jam is preserved in canning jars and hot water bathed.

A few tips when canning jam:

  • Make certain you always clean and sterilize your jars prior to using.
  • Use new canning lids that have been washed.
  • Hot water bath your jars according to the size of your jars and always adjust for your elevation.
  • Once jars are sealed and cooled for 12 hours, remove rings and wash jars. Replace rings if desired.
  • Label and date jars.

Canning Supplies

I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for  to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.   Please note that some of the links below are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase after clicking through the link.

A few supplies you may need to make this jam include Canning Utensil Set, Food Press, Large Pot, Thermometer and Canning Jars

Image result for hot water bath canning processing times                                                                                                                                                Image from Fresh Preserving

If you’d like to freeze excess blackberries, follow these steps for freezing raspberries.

Some additional jam recipes for you to try include Apricot Jam, Strawberry Jam and Plum Jam.

Don’t forget to PIN for later!  A canning jar filled with jam.

 

If you make this recipe, I’d love to hear about it! Leave a comment below or snap a picture and tag me on Instagram #beyondthechickencoop

 

5 from 6 votes
Seedless Blackberry Jam
Seedless Blackberry Jam
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
40 mins
Total Time
1 hr
 

Homemade blackberry jam without the seeds.

Course: Condiment
Cuisine: American
Keyword: blackberry jam, jam with berries, jam with wild berries, Seedless Blackberry Jam, wild blackbery recipes
Servings: 6 Cups
Calories: 39 kcal
Author: Kathy
Ingredients
  • 12 cups blackberries
  • 4 cups sugar
Instructions
  1. Mash and strain seeds from blackberries. Measure out 8 cups of strained fruit for jam.

  2. Put 8 cups of fruit and sugar in a heavy stockpot over medium heat. 

  3. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Continue cooking over medium heat until mixture comes to a boil. Stir every few minutes to prevent scorching.

  4. Boil for 20 minutes, stirring to prevent scorching. Heat jam to 220 degrees. Remove from heat. Ladle into clean, sterilized jars. 

  5. Wipe down rims and add canning lids and rings. Place in a hot water bath and boil jars for 10 minutes (adjust time according to elevation)

Recipe Notes

Jam thickens as it cools.  You can use a candy thermometer and cook until jam reaches 220 degrees F. 

I used pint sized jars (2 cups.) You can also use 1/2 pint size jars. 

Nutritional value is determined at 1 Tablespoon portions. 

Nutrition Facts
Seedless Blackberry Jam
Amount Per Serving
Calories 39
% Daily Value*
Potassium 29mg 1%
Total Carbohydrates 10g 3%
Sugars 9g
Vitamin A 0.8%
Vitamin C 4.6%
Calcium 0.5%
Iron 0.6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for  to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.   Please note that some of the links below are affiliate links, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase after clicking through the link.

 

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22 Comments

  • Reply
    Deann
    July 9, 2019 at 5:44 pm

    I must have done something wrong. It took way more than 12 c of berries to produce 8 cups of product! More like 20 cups, which luckily I had. I had skim off at least a cup of foam from the boiling liquid. And, in the end, it did not jell. At least it will be a really tasty blackberry sauce!

    • Reply
      Kathy
      July 11, 2019 at 12:37 pm

      Hi Deann – That’s quite a big difference in the measurements. Maybe some blackberries don’t produce as much juice and pulp. I do pack my cups pretty full when measuring. I’m glad you had enough berries. The jam does need to boil for at least 20 minutes or until it reaches the soft gel stage ( 220 degrees) This can be tricky without a candy thermometer. I also always include a few berries that aren’t all the way ripe and are a bit on the reddish side. That helps add a little extra pectin.

      Thanks for your feedback and happy canning!

  • Reply
    Lee Ann Verzi
    June 13, 2019 at 1:15 pm


    Just made your recipe this morning! So easy now can’t wait to try it!

    • Reply
      Kathy
      June 13, 2019 at 8:22 pm

      There’s nothing more wonderful than making homemade jam and enjoying it all year long!

    • Reply
      Cindy
      July 7, 2019 at 2:33 pm

      Made this recipe it does not thicken without using pectin

      • Reply
        Kathy
        July 11, 2019 at 12:44 pm

        Hi Cindy,
        I’m sorry this didn’t thicken for you. It does have to reach the soft gel stage which is reached at 220 degrees on a thermometer. You can also check by testing a small spoonful on a plate and letting it cool in the freezer. This takes a couple of minutes, but does indicate if the jam is thickening.
        Thank you!

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